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20121129
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economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they want
for both the present and the future, and as our economy continues to sign signs of improvement i'm not going to forget where the jobs go and for the people in terms of hope for the city and of course working with laborers, with our construction contractors, with the labor council. tim is here together as well and mike and working with everybody we have unprecedented announcement today and 100% locally financed project close to $500 million of private investment signifying that they wish to on their volition to be working with the city to hire 25% of their construction work force with san francisco residents. [applause] this is a wonderful, wonderful day. and that as part of that percent goal they are opening up themselves to working with us in an enforceable obligation on this label. rick is here representing for the golden state warriors and at the same time within this goal too we're going to accommodate returning veterans from our war and pllt to be part of this effort too -- [applause] >> yes. and for me it really means putting the word and the title warriors in the golde
of the biggest issues facing your district? >> in addition to the local economy that impacts the merchant corridors, to many vacant storefronts, transit issues, in every neighborhood we're having a real conversation about how we change, whether we should preserve aspects of the important characters of our neighborhood or think about building new things. there is also a real discussion we're having in many neighborhoods about affordability. i hear from too many tenants in the process of being evicted, homeowners being foreclosed on. we need to think about how all of us can continue to live in a city where the whole world wants to be. >> it is a great place to be. >> it is a great place to be. how do you balance the needs of your district versus the needs of the city as a whole? >> i have an incredibly diverse district. it encompasses north beach and chinatown. we have the city's famous hills. we have for the world comes to work, the financial district's, where the world comes to shop in union square, where the tourists spend time on fisherman's wharf , and the wonderful polk street neighbo
the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the kind of destinations that we look forward to
that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an economy, the best is yet to comment. let me leave you with this last idea. every moment affords us an opportunity to change the world. let's seize that moment in each and every moment that succeeds that moment and let's do that together in celebration of our asian-pacific heritage and recognition of the great heritage as all the people that make up san francisco and california. we will truly honored this month, our heritage and our future. thank you very much. [applause] >> ok. all right. we have some competition on the stage right now. >> a couple of other people we need to thank. we have a bunch of co-hosts, the san francisco board of supervisors. a round of applause, please. [applause] our event shares and co-chairs. [reading names] >> all right, thank you. [applause] >> those people give money, so please applaud. >> next, i would like to introduce betty yee, the 2014 candidate for controller. john, maybe you
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have
a few years ago. it floated for a little while. and with the economy right now it was just too much for us to keep open. we were lucky to start a partnership with the giants and we operate within their walls during the baseball season, but that is also not year-round. that is six months a year. so we came up with the idea of opening up a food truck. the best thing for us in this idea is san francisco is a pretty small town when it really comes down to it and sometimes you can't actually sustain two of the same concepts within those parameters. so this is kind of like our half-business that allows us to expand our business, and also innovate our cuisine with things that maybe would not fly when people want to sit down and have some food. to add to that, we are not the -- i guess, typically greasy taco truck that most people think of. all of our food is sustainable, organic and local. and we do focus on healthy mexican cuisine instead of kind of what it's known for. anyways, thank you for listening to us today. >> thank you. >> oh, and we are members of the ggra as well. >> hell
, that winning means generations of kids win. our economy wins. what i think are things that we do well. all of so many other aspects of our society win out when we use these opportunities and invite a lot more to come together and think creatively as we are the innovation capital of the world. we will continue to do that and continue to invite more partners to be our partners in this great event. go sf super bowl! [applause] >> mayor lee, it is an honor to be chairing this committee. we won't be able to do this without you so thank you for your support today. we have a lot of folks around us. and one silverstein. [ laughter] >> all about rich. i just want to say thank you to the team at goodby silverstein, the social media campaign. you have worked incredibly hard. rich, your team is amazing. come up here and tell everybody about the logo and the campaign. [applause] >> we have to win this. we are not in it to come in second. we've got to win it. i challenge anyone to have better looking goal posts than that. we have remarkable area. we have a great group of people. the logo really reflects
"gosh we're really going to suffer, and if we're going to be participating in our great economy in san francisco we have to find a way for better transportation routes to transfer people up north and down south of the city, and when we call ourselves a city as a transit first city there is no better example than that than what is reflected in the plans for the central subway. this project is a vital enhancement of our public transportation system. it's going to significantly improve the movement of tens of thousands of franciscans and if you were here this past weekend when people were predicting it would be jam san francisco instead of san francisco you knew that folks were educated because of the great leadership at our mta, our county transportation, all of our transit systems and were at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have th
or economy. the largest beneficiary would be california. we want to see what the cutting edge is. most of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good id
foundation needed to support the innovation economy in the united states. we are looking to produce better and new jobs and position to ensure that america remains at the forefront of the economy in the 21st century. we are working to ensure that all americans have the resources and the skills necessary to fully share in all of the possibilities, civic, social, and economic. all of these made possible by the internet. that is one of the reasons we are here today. he discovered for the administration is the broadband technology opportunities program or btop. this program was established in 2009 by the american reinvestment and recovery act and is administered by ntia. we have nearly $4 billion invested in roughly 230 projects across the country, all aimed at expanding broadband access and adoption in the country. and i want to tell you a little bit about the programs and then tell you about why we care so much about this issue. so, we have the btop for infrastructure projects. these are building broadband networks in areas that are currently underserved. they are making sure that hospitals,
. that what is takes to build the economy for the 31st century and that's what these grants are all b it's a pleasure to you here with you. >> >> [applause] >> thank you and thank you to our hud partners and at this moment i know i don't need to introduce him. i want to present to all of you mayor edwin lee. >> thank you henry and thank you deputy administrator henry for being here today. two fantastic planning grants from hud as part of a intense national competition and the reason we got this nod is the people decided they're going to come together and get this done. this is a choice. this is a choice that we made with our residents here that we're going to better ourselves. we're going to lift ourselves up. we're going to do it together. that's what it means. that's why the housing authority is here because they believe in the same thing. i want to thank the commissioners and staff and henry a fantastic job and all the leadership with all of the commissioners. i want to thank our partners. let 300,000 grants and they reflect the deputy administrator a collaboration and agreemen
that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question
i brought a lot of businesses vendor, they lowered all of our price because this economy is of scale. maybe that price can drop 50 cents a watt or more. that's another idea. there are ones that are just beginning where you can actually lease the system. you don't have to put any money up front at all. somebody else will own the system for you. you may pay an upfront cost a little bit that is less than what you might pay normally or some of them may not at all, depending on how they can make the finances work. the whole goal is to try to get you into p.v. with the least amount of resistance possible. instead of paying maybe the utility per month, you're going green and paying somebody else. thank you very much for your time. it's a pleasure. i'll take questions and i'll be here afterwards as long as you need me. thank you very much. [applause] >> so that's it, solar basics. first we talked about the technology, how it works and how it all hooks together. then we talked about net metering and how that makes solar easy and worry-free and finally we talked about the incentives from the s
that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group
and our economy. it will take the right perspective of leadership from the mayor's office to make those events be able to happen. >> [unintelligible] [applause] >> i am very sorry that we lost some of these events. i'm sure they added to cultural diversity. i do know that looking at the board, there are 280 events in a given year. street fairs, hip-hop, promotional events. there is only so much that we can do. we have to make sure that every event has enough personnel to keep it safe. be it the security plan, officers, or police officers. that is one thing i failed to mention earlier. paramount to training for an event that has enough people to prevent anything disastrous from occurring, you never know what can be prevented, because you never know what you can stop from happening. you never know if people have enough resources to make sure they do not have a problem. >> down to the last few questions, we are running out of time. >> let's see how quick we can get to it. >> ok. >> we will be really fast. i commend the police department. for those of us in the entertainment industry, we ha
appreciation for president obama and it was his idea of stimulating our economy to get these funds and we're going to use it for a long time. we're going to make this a great foundation, so tech sf is about utilizing those funds, creating an association with these technology companies that are creating the new jobs and the new products that come out. asking those technology companies to help us identify the skill sets, and then working with our educational institutions like san francisco state or city college which we invested on and want to continue their success and make sure there is curriculum developed so the skill sets that they want and those that are really growing and we have in addition to twitter and zinga and sales force we have products like the ones that are newly forming and moving into market street that are coming up. jack dorsi 's company and using the cell phones to we can buy everything off the phone. >> [inaudible] >> that's right. these other companies are moving in. they're helping us transform physically but we're also asking can i get a chance of working in tho
to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so
mayor this year. i wanted to make sure every neighborhood had a chance to share in the growing economy so we established the invest in neighborhoods program, and again who do i look forward to lead my programs in all of the communities? well tonight i want you to know that joaquin tores is heading up the program for the whole city, another great talent. [applause] and you know he has served as the director of neighborhood services for some time and he has gained a significant understanding of all of the neighborhoods. that's why i picked him. that's where the money is going by the way, and of course as he is leaving the neighborhood services who do i pick? who do i go for? well, christina paloan will be the next director of services. christina thank you very much for stepping up. [applause] as you all know too i have been struggling for this summer for the gun violence in our city, looking again for answers. it cannot just be our police department. we have to do more, and as you recall i wrestled with this whole concept of stop and frisk and many members of the latino members in
things they do is learning about the new economy and engage with the latest web and mobile technologies and they bring in entrepreneurers as guest speakers and share the work they're doing in our communities today and their career path and how technology influenced their lives so to spark america and the martinez brothers and others we thank you for your service. [applause] >> the next awardees will be recognized for their contributions in the field of business. to make this presentation we would like to invite to the stage the honorable from mexico mr. corona . [applause] >> jenny florez is the director -- i'm sorry. would you join us at the stage. [applause] jenny is a community development director of city northern california. she is responsible for the community development, investment in the community -- community redevelopment act program and making sure that under served communities in the marketplace have access to financial services and products. prior to her position with citi she served with the congress of california seniors a state wide nonprofit organization dedicated t
's population and economy continue to grow we are decreasing our carbon emissions and achieve a sustainable environment. for instance this requires all new buildings designed to meet the gas reduction goals. that means more than 6 million square feet of commercial space and 11,000 housing units all in the development pipeline have been designed using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco publ
this district will help the economy. so for a lot of meat and detail you can look at the management plans and attachments. so the ballots will be mailed out by the end of this week to all the hotels. and then we'll have an informational meeting for the public to attend in january at the budget and finance committee. it will be on january 23rd. and there there will be a ballot hearing will the ballots will be voted on by the hotels, returned to the department of elections and counted by the department of elections at a february 5th hearing. that will be in front of the full board of supervisors and testimony will be taken that day as well. and then there is other legislation that goes with the resolution to establish the district, which would be voted on in the future after the ballots come back february 5th. there is also a resolution to issue bonds. so that will have to go to the board of supervisors, as well as well as to our capital committee for consideration. and then the design process and the ceqa process. that is starting this december. but that will go for two years. so there w
, but these three principles. mastery, been technically proficient in your area. it is economy, where you are able to take initiative, operate within a zone that has been broad enough for you to use your creativity. it is purpose. purpose on behalf of the people of san francisco. i think all of the nominees that we are honoring tonight are motivated by these principles. i want to thank the department heads who have employed them. they allow these people to flourish, to be an autonomous, and move forward in a way that benefits the people of san francisco. we think the best and bgh
business. when the economy is strong, all lenders are shopping for transactions. in times are tough on credit, you want to rely on those deeper liberation ships with your lender. you want to develop a relationship with a lender. it is the case where you want to open up an account, while to have another bank services that you want to have a relationship with your lender with it because when you go to them for any loan requests, you want them to know about your business and feel like they are a partner of yours, not just that you are shopping them. if you are shopping, you are just looking for the best deal from them, rather than a long- term relationship. >> i want to thank everyone for coming. hopefully, you have all signed up for our updates. we are going to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations
on an economy of scale, you know, go with organic with the ones that have the highest levels of pesticides. our website has a link to those tips so i can show you where that would be. and now we're going to pop into the living room and talk about flame retardants which are an important issue for any firefighters who are working in the field because it's those burns that are going to create exposures, so as folks in the home are thinking about that, once they found that frequent hand washing can reduce the actual levels of these flame retardants because we touch them, they get on our hands, they're in household dusts and make their way into our bodies, so washing them off our hands can reduce exposures, using a vak coupe with a hepa filter and a big move that could come down the pike is going down to legacy fabrics like wool and fabric that don't require the use of these mraim retardants at all and burn much more slowly, this's been some amazing videos that you can look at that you may have seen that show the legacy fabrics burning so much more slowly than the flame retardant treated ones, so th
of the economy or it takes a long time to get through the full process. so, you know, it's hard to tell, as i said, what's going to happen by the end of the year. we also don't have -- if we can put this on. we also haven't seen any of the revenue yet for the apartment and hotel license fees because that's not due till -- i believe it's december 10th since that's the date i'm counting on to pay my taxes. and the investment and other small types of revenues, $100,000, $200,000, you can't really tell, but we are tracking where i would expect that to be. in term of expenses, as we all know, a good part of our budget is for personnel. at this point we have spent about 29% of our salaries and fringe budget. we are, as i mentioned, continuing to try to get people on staff. we talked about this before. we have some new hires that have occurred since last meeting. a majority of them are prop s. three prop s positions, electrical and senior engineer. and then we have three people who have been either placed in our department for disability placements or from the new development. we talked a little bit
to compete in the global economy tomorrow, pal, you've got to embrace diversity. why does coca-cola write a brief to the united states supreme court and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. similarly if we want to get down to the local level and address this issue, we've got to teach our kids that the sooner that you embrace difference and understand that your muslim classmate or your seat classmate or your gay classmate or your limited english professor classmate might be tomorrow's ceo or today's best friend of yours, the better off we will be. you have a leg up, having done about 30 jury trials across this country and seen interactions between people of diverse backgrounds. >> and here we try to celebrate, not just embrace, our diversity. celebrate all our interesting diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or i
newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as far too often as a rite of passage. we certainly are seeing evidence in ways that i don't recall, the levels of violence, the vitriolic violence, it's not just coming from the back of the school, it's c
this is important, in the midst of crazy budgets and real chaos due to the bad economy and some of the massive cuts the schools have endured, this is so important because a student can't learn, we know, a student can't learn if they are fearful. they will skip school, they will not come or when they are there they are not able to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have
, a hotel desk employee, a politician, they go like this. economy of movement. that's their deal. traffic cop. been on the force a long time. new guy. the old veteran is going, dude, you'll wear out. it will take about two years and you'll want to retire. that's what happens. this t.s.a. kid, he's new, he goes like this. it's my turn to come through the metal detector, he's doing this. my first thought is that's a little overdone. this works. that's fine. i come through and i'm giggling, first thought wrong. it's quarter to 6:00 in the morning. something's funny? yeah. about i can't tell you what it is. he said, you've been selected for a special screening. i said, i've been chosen! you ever watch a homophobe's eyes roll back into his skull? that mental reset of the computer just blinks. i need male assist on two, please. i need a male assist on two. i don't care. this disease doesn't care, the criminal justice system doesn't care. g.o.d. doesn't care, heterosexual, you're perfect, bisexual, you're greedy, life is a buffet for you every day. i'll take one of him, two of her and all that b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)